Friday, 10 June 2022

Fava Beans, No Chianti

I've never seen Silence of the Lambs [too violent] and never drunk Chianti - so I am not sure I understand Anthony Hopkins' comment in the film. Fava beans are very popular in the US, and sometimes called horse beans, or field beans. They've been around 10,000 years, first cultivated  in the Middle East - and a good staple food, because the beans can be eaten fresh, but also are easy to dry and then rehydrate for cooking. 

I bought some falafel wrap kits from Roger's Wholesale when we were back in Dorset. One can of chickpeas was needed to make the falafels*. It was only when I opened up the box that I found the interesting information that the original falafels were made with fava beans...
I was making the falafels to serve a light lunch. Not with wraps, but some leftover bulgur wheat salad, and a green salad [home grown lettuce] In
 the UK fava beans are usually called broad  beans. I'm growing these in the raised bed. I picked just a few of the longest pods [don't they look gorgeous in the pottery bowl?]

I podded them, blanched them briefly, and dressed them with olive oil, some lemon zest and homegrown mint.The falafel kit included tahini sauce and pomegranate salad dressing. Along with a slice of home made brown bread, it tasted lovely.

I am looking forward to harvesting the rest of the bean crop in coming days. Do any of you have any good broad bean recipes, please?

*I oven baked the falafels, it is much healthier than deep frying them. 







19 comments:

  1. I’ll send over a recipe for a broad bean bacon and sorrel flan. Delicious! (Jane from Dorset)

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  2. Broad beans are something I've not fitted into my space, only like them very tiny and they are so prone to blackfly. Didn't know the history - interesting - thank you

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  3. I just like them as they are, with a bit of butter and lemon juice.

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    1. As is often the case, simplest is best

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  4. Your homegrown fava bean pods look great!

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    1. I am wondering, do they feature in traditional Sri Lankan cuisine, Bless?

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    2. Not that I know of, Angela; if I were to grow them, myself, I would probably harvest the pods when they are still young and tender and cook them as regular green beans!

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    3. Thanks for replying, Bless. I suppose there are a number of veg where the choice is between eating them young and tender or growing them larger for the benefit of their keeping qualities.

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  5. I went to see Silence in the Lambs with DH. I lasted ten minutes and waited in the lobby for the rest of the film.

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    1. I was like that when I saw Pinocchio - my Gran had to take me out of the cinema as I was in such a state [mind you, I was only 5]

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  6. It is thought that the word falafel comes from the Egyptian word 'ful', which means fava beans.
    I love to eat falafel although I've only had them with chickpeas. ~skye

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    1. Thank you Skye, you know I love word origins. I've just remembered buying "Foul Medames" [dried beans] in the middle eastern supermarket in Elephant and Castle, simply because the name made me smile.

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  7. I absolutely love broad beans but never see them here ( Pacific NW) or when we lived in Illinois. I saw canned ones once, but they were definitely not as good.
    Yours look great!

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    1. Perhaps you could grow them in your garden?

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  8. No broad bean recipes to offer, like JanF I never see them over here. I love falafel and I also have a recipe to bake them.

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    1. Baking beats frying for ease, and health reasons

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  9. I had the most wonderful fava bean pate on crisp breads at music camp once. They made it into a kind of hummus (used the beans instead of Chickpeas) with oodles of garlic and and it was wonderful!

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    1. That sounds great, I'll look for a recipe on line. Thanks K.

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