Monday, 7 February 2022

Doing The Right Thing

Having spent yesterday in quiet reflection at Sandringham, on the 70th anniversary of her father's death, I presume the Queen has to attend to 'business as usual' this morning. 

It has always been her practice to keep "Accession Day" as a personal, private time - remembering the life of George VI, and his death, which marked the beginning of her long reign as Queen.
This year however, she will be without her 'strength and stay'. She first met Prince Philip in 1934 - she was 8, he was 13, but they did not really become friends till 5 years later - then they fell in love, and married in 1947. A relationship lasting over 80 years. It was Philip who had to break the news to her that her beloved father was dead - and that she was Queen. I have no doubt that this year, acknowledging the anniversary of her accession was incredibly hard for her.
On her 21st birthday, she said "I declare before you all that my whole life, whether long or short, shall be devoted to your service" She didn't know that within 5 years she would be Queen- or that she would become the longest reigning monarch this country has known. For over 70 years, her life has exemplified duty, leadership and character. She has always endeavoured to 'do the right thing'.** The photograph of a little elderly woman, sitting alone at her husband's funeral, wearing her mask, has gone round the world. There were lockdown rules, and even as the Queen, she did not consider herself exempt from following them.
Last month she had to remove her second son's status and his "Royal Highness" title. Her third grandson continues to cause ripples across the pond. The Windsors are not what you might describe as one big happy family right now.
And her government is certainly not in a very good place either. It is 30 years since she gave a speech referring to her annus horribilis. I suspect she may feel that the last twelve months have been equally hard.
** these words were said by the ABC Justin Welby this week.
Keep going Ma'am, I'm sure that the Archbishop and his Boss have got your back, even if others around you seem to be making bad choices.

16 comments:

  1. She is a remarkable person, isn't she?

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  2. Her speech is very pertinent. She is s good example to us!

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  3. Hear, hear.
    She is an amazing lady and will one day be sadly missed. Such an examole to us all.

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    1. Let us hope she is with us for a while longer

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  4. She is an amazing example to us all.

    And I guess we should look back at history to realise that the royals have never really had a smooth ride, there have been bad apples in every single generation. Which makes it even more admirable that the Queen has always been pretty much beyond reproach.

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    1. That is a very good point, looking at our past royals - we've had a GOOD monarch for a long time

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  5. The photograph of the Queen sitting alone at her husband's funeral, must mean something to everyone who during the pandemic has been unable to receive normal comfort from family or friends at their time of loss.

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    1. It certainly does! How I longed to hug all my family at Gillian's funeral last year

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  6. That picture of the queen alone always brings a lump to my throat - still doing the right thing after all these years. It's not a bad example to follow.

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  7. I find that a heart-wrenching image, particularly bearing in mind the full contexts in which it was taken. Something to reflect on, some more than others.

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    1. It sums up the heartbreaking reality of bereavement

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  8. She is amazing. We'll be a different place when she is called home.

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